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« Movie Review: The Mysterious Case of The Blood Shed (2007) | Main | Interview: Mark Clark »

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

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Paul Bibeau

Great review! Can't wait to see it.

ILoz Zoc

Wonderful insight. Yes, you're right, the civilian perspective is covered: I recall the scene in Gojira where a mother is holding on to her two children and telling them they're going to see dad soon. It's a chilling scene, especially with the destruction all around them. Cloverfield intensifies that personal tragedy throughout by leaving out the scientists and minimizing the military's role.

And good luck with the Rondos! Cinefantastique Online (http://cinefantastiqueonline.com/) is super.

ILoz Zoc

Wonderful insight. Yes, you're right, the civilian perspective is covered: I recall the scene in Gojira where a mother is holding on to her two children and telling them they're going to see dad soon. It's a chilling scene, especially with the destruction all around them. Cloverfield intensifies that personal tragedy throughout by leaving out the scientists and minimizing the military's role.

And good luck with the Rondos! Cinefantastique Online (http://cinefantastiqueonline.com/) is super.

Cinefantastique Online

Regarding the use of a camera to provide a civilian perspective: That happens in the Godzilla series twice. In GOJIRA, the TV crew is filming the destruction, and one reporter says solemnly, "This is not a movie or a TV show; this is real." I always took that as the filmmaker's hint to the movie audience to take the subject seriously, not as a fun monster movie.

In GODZILLA, MOTHRA, KING GHIDORAH: GIANT MONSTERS ALL-OUT ATTACK, the final reel consists mostly of the young female reporter tracking the action and filming it with her hand-held camera, for live broadcast.

Obviously, CLOVERFIELD took the idea further, creating something derived from the past that still looks new.

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